urban institute nonprofit social and economic policy research

Education

students writing

The Urban Institute conducts interdisciplinary studies that explore critical intersections between schools, families, communities, and the workplace. Drawing upon expertise and perspectives from across our research centers, the Education Policy Cluster coordinates studies focused on family and neighborhood factors that influence school performance and educational success, the potential of alternative school improvement and reform initiatives, the effectiveness of both K–12 and post-secondary systems in preparing young people for careers, strategies for helping at-risk youth stay and succeed in school, and school financing mechanisms.

In addition, the Urban Institute has conducted research on issues that have been central to education policy, including school and teacher assessment, and evaluation of specific reforms.

Education Policy Cluster

Contributing Scholars: Akiva Liberman, Kim Rueben, Austin Nichols, John Roman, Sue Popkin, Peter Tatian, Mike Pergamit, Bob Lerman, Marla McDaniel, Megan Cahill, Erwin de Leon, Gina Adams, Kathryn Pettit, Caroline Ratcliffe, Signe-Mary McKernan, Maria Enchautegui, Elsa Falkenburger, Lauren Eyster, Demetra Smith Nightengale, Sara Edelstein, Julia Isaacs, Megan Gallagher, Zach McDade, Heather Hahn, Gene Steuerle, Tracy Vericker, Pamela Loprest, Josh Mitchell, Mary Cunningham, Genevieve Kenney, Elaine Maag, Heather Sandstrom, Kelly Devers

Viewing 1-5 of 569. Most recent posts listed first.Next Page >>

A Review of Child Care Needs of Eligible Families in Massachusetts (Research Report)
Julia Isaacs, Michael Katz, Sarah Minton, Molly Michie

This report reviews the need for subsidized child care in Massachusetts. Gaps between need and supply were identified by comparing estimates of children needing care to licensing and subsidy data. Additional information was collected through interviews with experts across the state. The report's findings include gaps for infant and toddler care, children in two of six sub-state regions, and families working nontraditional hours. It also highlighted challenges geographically matching needs and supply and the link between the child care subsidy system and the broader child care market.

Posted to Web: March 27, 2015Publication Date: March 27, 2015

The Second Year of Accelerating Opportunity: Implementation Findings from the States and Colleges (Research Report)
Theresa Anderson, Lauren Eyster, Robert I. Lerman, Carolyn T. O'Brien, Maureen Conway, Ranita Jain, Marcela Montes

The second annual implementation report for the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative in four states finds that:

  • colleges aligned pathways and supports with local needs
  • students were satisfied with AO
  • AO instructors grew more adept at team teaching
  • colleges struggled to recruit adult education students
  • states and colleges sought new financial support and developed partnerships
  • colleges served more students with fewer resources
  • states changed policies to support and sustain AO

AO provides grants to help community colleges create career pathway programs to enroll students with low basic skills into for-credit career and technical education courses to improve educational and employment outcomes.

Posted to Web: March 12, 2015Publication Date: March 12, 2015

Accelerating Opportunity: A Portrait of Students and Their Program Experiences from the 2014 Student Survey (Research Report)
Shayne Spaulding, Ananda Martin-Caughey

This report presents findings from a survey of students enrolled in Accelerating Opportunity (AO) career pathways in spring 2014. AO provides grants to help community colleges create career pathway programs to enroll students with low basic skills into for-credit career and technical education courses to improve educational and employment outcomes. Survey respondents tended to be non-traditional students; nearly two-thirds were 25 or older and more than half had dependent children. Student reported higher levels of education than initially targeted by the program, with nearly 90 percent reporting at least a secondary school credential. Generally, students expressed high satisfaction with AO.

Posted to Web: March 12, 2015Publication Date: March 12, 2015

Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care (Research Report)
Marla McDaniel, Mark Courtney, Mike Pergamit, Christopher Lowenstein

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Posted to Web: March 03, 2015Publication Date: March 03, 2015

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs (Research Brief)
Amy Dworsky, Cheryl Smithgall, Mark Courtney

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Posted to Web: March 03, 2015Publication Date: March 03, 2015

 Next Page >>
Email this Page