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Immigrants

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The immigrant population in the United States has burgeoned over the past few decades. From 1990 to 2006, the number of immigrants rose from 20 million to more than 37 million. Urban Institute immigration policy experts study how the foreign-born population is growing, integrating, and changing.

We have analyzed immigrants' contributions to the labor force and the economy, tracked fast-growing immigrant communities, studied the effect of No Child Left Behind on immigrant children and English Language Learners, and surveyed foreign-born households’ health, well-being, and economic mobility. Read more.

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Ten Years of Language Access in Washington, DC (Research Report)
Hamutal Bernstein, Julia Gelatt, Devlin Hanson, William Monson

This report provides an overview of the implementation of the Language Access Act within the context of the unique demographic and economic characteristics of the District's immigrant community. We describe DC's Language Access Program, its creation, and evolution, profile the city's LEP/NEP population, and identify accomplishments and challenges for each of the three major domains required for ensuring full language access: identifying language needs, serving language needs, and monitoring the provision of those services. We conclude with recommendations for next steps for city government officials and other stakeholders as they continue to strengthen the Language Access Program in the District.

Posted to Web: April 15, 2014Publication Date: April 15, 2014

Immigration and the Changing Landscape for Local Service Delivery: Demographic Shifts in Cities and Neighborhoods (Research Report)
Julia Gelatt, Gina Adams, William Monson

Growing immigration affects many communities across the United States, but the demographic impacts vary widely, with implications for service delivery. Some places have experienced high levels of immigration for decades and others are facing new influxes. In many communities, the mix of national origins of immigrants has been shifting. These changes—increasing numbers, geographic dispersion, and increasing diversity—have played out very differently across US communities and over time. In this brief, we provide examples of how national trends have played out in select US cities and neighborhoods. We then highlight the implications of these trends for effective service delivery.

Posted to Web: March 19, 2014Publication Date: March 19, 2014

Improving Access to Prekindergarten for Children of Immigrants: Enrollment Strategies (Fact Sheet / Data at a Glance)
Julia Gelatt, Gina Adams, Sandra Huerta

Children of immigrants can benefit from attending prekindergarten, though they enroll less, on average, than children with US-born parents. This fact sheet focuses on strategies for helping immigrant families overcome language, documentation, and other logistical barriers when enrolling their children in prekindergarten programs. It is one of three factsheets, all drawn from Supporting Immigrant Families’ Access to Prekindergarten. This detailed report draws on interviews conducted with more than 40 prekindergarten directors and staff, directors of early childhood education programs, and other specialists to present strategies for improving prekindergarten enrollment among immigrant families and English Language Learners.

Posted to Web: March 19, 2014Publication Date: March 19, 2014

Improving Access to Prekindergarten for Children of Immigrants: Building Relationships (Fact Sheet / Data at a Glance)
Julia Gelatt, Gina Adams, Sandra Huerta

Children of immigrants can benefit from attending prekindergarten, though they enroll less, on average, than children with US-born parents. This fact sheet focuses on strategies for building trust and good relationships with immigrant parents and for designing immigrant- and ELL-friendly programs. It is one of three factsheets, all drawn from Supporting Immigrant Families’ Access to Prekindergarten. This detailed report draws on interviews conducted with more than 40 prekindergarten directors and staff, directors of early childhood education programs, and other specialists to present strategies for improving prekindergarten enrollment among immigrant families and English Language Learners.

Posted to Web: March 19, 2014Publication Date: March 19, 2014

Supporting Immigrant Families' Access to Prekindergarten (Research Report)
Julia Gelatt, Gina Adams, Sandra Huerta

Children of immigrants can benefit from attending prekindergarten, though they enroll less, on average, than children with US-born parents. This detailed report draws on interviews conducted with over 40 prekindergarten directors and staff, directors of early childhood education programs, and other specialists to present strategies for improving prekindergarten enrollment among immigrant families and English Language Learners. This includes strategies for outreach to support prekindergarten enrollment; helping immigrant families overcome language, documentation, and other logistical barriers when enrolling their children in prekindergarten programs; and building trust and good relationships with immigrant parents and designing immigrant- and ELL-friendly programs.

Posted to Web: March 19, 2014Publication Date: March 19, 2014

Organizational Efficiency and Early Disposition Programs in Federal Courts (Research Report)
KiDeuk Kim

Early disposition or "fast-track" programs in federal sentencing allow a prosecutor to offer a reduced sentence in exchange for a defendant's prompt guilty plea and waiver of certain legal rights. Based on immigration cases in federal districts, this study finds that fast-track participants received a modest reduction in sentence length compared to otherwise similar non-participants. The estimated reduction in case processing time attributable to fast-track programs was also of moderate consequence to the government. The report discusses policy implications of fast-track processing in terms of organizational efficiency and fair treatment of defendants in federal court.

Posted to Web: February 18, 2014Publication Date: January 24, 2014

More than 11 Million: Unauthorized Immigrants and Their Families: Fact Sheet (Fact Sheet / Data at a Glance)
Maria E. Enchautegui

The effects of immigration reform proposals will extend well beyond the 11 million unauthorized U.S. residents. Those unauthorized immigrants share their homes with 8.7 million people who legally reside in the United States. Three quarters of those legal residents are U.S. born citizens and 60 percent are children.

Posted to Web: December 23, 2013Publication Date: December 19, 2013

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