urban institute nonprofit social and economic policy research

Nonprofits

Building House

The nonprofit sector has been growing steadily, both in size and financial impact, for more than a decade. Between 2001 and 2011, the number of nonprofits has increased 25 percent; from 1,259,764 million to 1,574,674 million today. The growth rate of the nonprofit sector has surpassed the rate of both the business and government sectors.

In 2010, nonprofits contributed products and services that added $779 billion to the nation’s gross domestic product; 5.4 percent of GDP. Nonprofits are also a major employer, accounting for 9 percent of the economy’s wages, and over 10 percent of jobs in 2009. Read more.

Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy

The UI Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy celebrated 15 years with a series of 15th Anniversary events to bring into focus the big issues facing society and the nonprofit sector. More

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Viewing 1-5 of 418. Most recent posts listed first.Next Page >>

Innovations in NYC Health and Human Services Policy: Early Learn NYC (Research Brief)
Julia Gelatt, Heather Sandstrom

As part of the Bloomberg administration’s focus on young children, New York City reorganized its system of contracted child care through EarlyLearn NYC. This program braided funding from child care, Head Start, and state universal prekindergarten to improve access and continuity for low-income children and their families. EarlyLearn NYC has implemented higher program quality standards and redistributed contracts across the city to increase the supply of care in targeted, high-need neighborhoods. This brief is one in a series examining selected social service initiatives undertaken during the Bloomberg administration.

Posted to Web: March 31, 2014Publication Date: March 31, 2014

Innovations in NYC Health and Human Services Policy: Strengthening Nonprofits through Effective Cross-Center Collaborations (Research Brief)
Saunji Fyffe, Carol J. De Vita

Like most cities, New York City counts on government, business, and nonprofit organizations to work together to create supportive, safe, and productive environments. Although building and sustaining effective partnerships can be mutually beneficial, it is seldom easy to achieve. This brief describes how New York City government and area nonprofits worked together to build meaningful partnerships and collaborations during Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration while strengthening the capacity of nonprofit agencies. This brief is one in a series examining selected social service initiatives undertaken during the Bloomberg administration.

Posted to Web: March 17, 2014Publication Date: March 17, 2014

Innovations in NYC Health and Human Services Policy: Procurement and Shared Services (Research Brief)
Carol J. De Vita, Sarah L. Pettijohn

Nonprofit organizations are a vital partner to government in the delivery of human services. Through government contracts, nonprofits deliver a broad range of essential services to local residents. This brief examines three New York City initiatives to improve procurement, save money, and help city agencies and local nonprofits function more efficiently. Undertaken with guidance from the Strengthening Nonprofits Task Force, these initiatives feature innovative uses of electronic storage and information sharing. This brief is one in a series examining selected social service initiatives undertaken during the Bloomberg administration.

Posted to Web: March 17, 2014Publication Date: March 17, 2014

Social Support Networks and Their Effects on Hardship Avoidance (Research Report)
Gregory B. Mills, Sisi Zhang

Low-income households who report having strong social support networks tend to experience lower rates of material hardship, based on data from the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation. The strength of one’s support network is measured by the extent of help one expects to receive if needed from family, friends, and community. Results are significant across a range of hardships related to housing, utilities, medical care, and food. The greater vulnerability to hardship among those with weaker support networks suggests that government benefit programs should be targeted, whenever possible, to those less likely to have access to such support.

Posted to Web: January 14, 2014Publication Date: December 09, 2013

Addressing Deep and Persistent Poverty: A Framework for Philanthropic Planning and Investment (Research Report)
Laudan Y. Aron, Wendy Jacobson, Margery Austin Turner

The JPB Foundation engaged the Urban Institute to provide background on the problem of deep and persistent poverty in the United States. This paper summarizes the history of US antipoverty policies, synthesizes existing knowledge about poverty and deep poverty, and presents a framework for understanding the complex and multi-faceted landscape of antipoverty efforts today. It also draws on interviews with over 30 experts, philanthropists, and thought leaders in the field to review and distill the most current thinking about promising strategies for tackling deep and persistent poverty. Drawing on these facts and insights, we present a series of questions and choices that any foundation wishing to invest in this area would be well-advised to consider.

Posted to Web: December 23, 2013Publication Date: December 23, 2013

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